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Her Career Led to Mercy

September 24, 2019
By Deb Daley

She not only found her career at Mercy High School, but her Catholic faith and the charisms of Catherine McAuley were nurtured there.  Now Sandy Goetzinger-Comer ’70 is the Director of Communications for the Sisters of Mercy of the America, West Midwest where she continues her passion for helping others while publicizing the lives of the Sisters and seeing the impact those Sisters have on society.

Her journey began at Holy Cross Elementary School and it was a natural evolution to attend the high school across the street.

“Having Sisters as teachers and examples of Catherine and her commitment to the poor of the world at Mercy was very life giving and has remained with me throughout the years.”

According to Sandy, she entered Mercy as a shy girl. However, she made a decision to overcome that trait with the help of classmates and her involvement at the school. 

“For me, academics were a priority.  I actually found my career at Mercy.  I was an avid reader and loved English and writing. But when I took Journalism as an elective my sophomore year, I knew it was for me.”

She did reporting, photography and layout and was on the yearbook staff. She also took three years of French and four years of Latin.  Being a member of French Club and Junior Achievement, while also covering events for Journalism, kept her busy.  

She recalls going to Mercy and Prep dances and having a great group of friends, many who are still friends today.

Sandy received a full scholarship to Creighton University and felt well prepared because of her education at Mercy.

Her senior year at Mercy, she took part in a journalism competition that the University of Nebraska at Lincoln hosted. She had to create a successful ad on the spot. She was surprised to learn she earned first place.  She also entered the photo competition and placed second.

“My Mercy education and the experience I gained there helped me succeed in the competition.”

At Creighton she was involved in Delta Zeta sorority and, as part of her Journalism curriculum, the university’s newspaper, The Creightonian. She worked on the publication for four years, becoming editor a semester of her senior year.

She thought she would eventually be a teacher because most women at that time either taught, were secretaries or nurses.

“I took a part-time position at Omaha Steaks as a copy writer and I had a major ‘ah ha’ moment. I learned that the field of Journalism has many opportunities.”

Her first position was at the Midlands Business Journal.  During her tenure she did everything from interviewing, writing stories, headlines, taking, developing and printing photos, designing ads, laying out and pasting up the paper and even preparing and making negatives for printing.  

“My education and experiences at both Mercy and Creighton really gave me an advantage as I took on these responsibilities.”

In 1982, she joined Mutual of Omaha in employee communications. Among the positions she held was editor of the employee publication at Mutual of Omaha and at the same time she wrote for the daily newsletter.  Later Sandy was assigned to the sales communication and worked on incentive/marketing materials for the sales staff.

“My ability to be flexible and my education in many aspects of journalism served me well.”
Sandy moved to the University of Nebraska Medical Center in 1989 beginning as a publications coordinator and then heading the Department of Public Affairs for her last 13 years.  She was with the institution for 19 years and their department reported to the chancellor’s office. As a result, the work involved overseeing a talented team and their work in media relations, publications, employee communications and special events.  “When I began there in 1989, the Durham Outpatient Center did not yet exist.” 

“I especially loved interviewing researchers, learning the amazing things they were working on and then finding a way to communicate their discoveries with the general public.  The environment was exciting, and I felt I was contributing to the health of individuals and families. Again, Mercy instilled in me that desire to make a difference.”

In 2008, she saw God’s hand in her life again when she decided to work for the Sisters of Mercy as their structure changed from 25 communities to six and the West Midwest Community was born. The West Midwest includes Sisters, Mercy Associates, Companions in Mercy and staff from Detroit, Michigan, to Auburn, California with major concentrations in Detroit, Chicago, Cedar Rapids, Omaha, Burlingame (near San Francisco) and Auburn (near Sacramento) California. The communications staff of three is responsible for a bimonthly newsletter,  writing stories of the Sisters to share internally and externally, media relations, photography, videography, design and special events. They also connect regularly via technology with colleagues at the other five major areas across the United States, Guam, the Philippines, South and Central America. As a result, her work has involved travel to meet and witness the work of the Sisters first-hand.  

“I am inspired by these highly educated, talented women, how they live their lives as individuals and in community and what they do to help those who are marginalized and address issues that affect us a nation.”

As Catherine McAuley addressed the needs of the day, so too have the Sisters of Mercy. From the early years of opening hospitals and schools, the areas of focus for the Sisters of Mercy have changed over the years to identify five key areas which they call “critical concerns.” Sandy enjoys sharing the stories of their work in these areas which are earth, anti-racism, non-violence, immigration and women. 

Over the years, Sandy has continued to be involved with the high school and has served on the Alumnae Council and Board of Trustees. She participates in FIESTA, the annual Golf Fest and has helped with the phone-at-thon.  Currently she is working with classmates to plan their 5oth class reunion.  No surprise, Mercy is also part of her family’s legacy.  Mercy graduates are: daughter, Lauren ‘13; sisters, Joan Goetzinger Villanueva ’75 and Pat Goetzinger ’76; and nieces Sara Goetzinger Tingelhoff ’93 and Alyssa Goetzinger Wattonvilel ‘96. Great niece Delanie Wattonville is currently a sophomore. 

“I support Mercy because I want to see the tradition of academic excellence and the caring environment that shapes future women of mercy continue.  I also value the fact that Mercy makes it possible for girls who might never be able to afford this education to do so.”

She should know.  Mercy helped her discover a career where her skills and talent are making a difference. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Living Values Through Mercy Volunteer Corps

September 12, 2019
By Deb Daley

She always keeps Mercy in heart and now she is spending a year in volunteer service with the Sisters of Mercy through the Mercy Volunteer Corps.  Amber Johnson ’14 is living her values and supporting Mercy’s critical concerns in Philadelphia, Penn. 

Amber had shadowed at several Catholic high schools but chose Mercy because of the club and academic opportunities as well as the welcoming atmosphere.
“I lived in Elkhorn, so we formed a fun carpool with six Mercy girls who commuted to the school.”  

While at the school she was very involved in theatre, singing, clubs and other activities.

“I had a strong circle of friends.   We were always ourselves while at Mercy.  I grew in my spiritual live and learned unabashedly in my classes.” 

She also saw first-hand the kindness and empathy of the Mercy community. 

“When my brother passed away the year I graduated, I received so much kindness and support from the Mercy community.  I am still very appreciative of that.” 
After graduation in 2014, she attended the University of Nebraska Omaha for five years, receiving a Bachelor’s in International Studies with a minor in Political Science. 

“I was also fortunate to study abroad through educational fellowships, where I learned Mandarin Chinese,” she shared. 

She was inducted into the Mercy Volunteer Corps (MVC) group of 2019-2020, just after graduating in May 2019. MVC is an opportunity to do a volunteer service year through the Mercy sisters; it is not a vocational path but it is a chance to live out your values and support Mercy’s critical concerns which focus on protecting the environment, human rights, and pursuing a compassionate, service-oriented path.  There are placements in 10 cities in the U.S. and one international placement in Guyana. The organization covers the housing, provides a stipend for groceries and personal spending, and includes several spiritual retreats throughout the year. The job sites have a focus on social services, medical services, and teaching/education. 

Amber is working at the Nationalities Service Center in Philadelphia. She is helping recent refugees to the U.S. in enrolling for healthcare, accompanying individuals with high language barriers to doctor appointments, and running a food pantry.

“Not only am I able to live my Mercy values, I am connecting with great folks, and experiencing another region of the U.S.”  

She stays connected to Mercy and has many dear friends from her school days. 
Her advice to others post- high school is to be open to life leading you in new directions and to take time to find out what brings fire to your heart.  She did!

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Lawyer Makes an Impact

July 12, 2019
By Deb Daley

Although she only went to Mercy High School for two years, that time had a profound effect on Adina Johnson ’74. The now Principal at Roberts Perryman, P.C., St. Louis, Missouri, treasures her experience at Mercy and recalls how self-affirming the community.

"I enrolled in Mercy my junior year as our family had moved from New Mexico.  The transition in the middle of your high school years could have been rough, but Mercy welcomed me with open arms.  I never felt like an outsider,” she said. 
While she was at Mercy she was involved in theatre, Student Council and participated in short-hand competitions.

After graduation, she attended the University of Missouri majoring in English and earning her Secondary Education certification.  Adina taught for 10 years.  She chose teaching because through her Catholic education she learned the importance of doing what you can to make a difference.  That same inspiration led her to a degree in law.

“When I decided to change careers, I wanted a profession again where I could make a difference. Through the law I believed there were many ways I could make a difference,” she said.

Adina went to school at night and earned her law degree from St. Louis University in 1998.  She worked at various firms but joined Roberts Perryman, P.C. 15 years ago.  In her current position she litigates cases where professionals get sued and also is involved in family law.

She travels for work and is a participates in the city’s Women’s Lawyer Group.  

“One of my favorite activities is the annual Christmas program for children in foster care or who have parents in prison that is sponsored by the Bar Association of St. Louis." 

She still has good friends from her days at Mercy although she rarely gets back for alumnae events.  Adina keeps in touch through updates from her class group and enjoys receiving information from the school.

“I feel the all-girls environment at Mercy was very beneficial.  There was no judgment, no competition.  You got to be who you are, which was very self-affirming.  And the Catholic education focused less on dogma and more on how you could impact the world,” she said.

Aida Johnson ’74, is doing that every day.

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

A Desire to Help People

June 17, 2019
By Deb Daley

Her nonprofit may have been created by accident, but after six years that organization, Restoring Dignity, was recently given 501(c)3 status.  Hannah Wyble ’05 is the company’s only full-time employee, but there are thousands of volunteers who support its mission to help refugees.

“Back in 2012, I was at the Salvation Army and working with some Sudanese girls. Their house was substandard; there were two towels for a household of five and deplorable conditions.  I asked the question, 'Couldn’t we do something about this?'  A cousin of the family and I started reaching out to people online and hundreds of donations and volunteers who wanted to help came pouring in. Our organization was born,” Hannah said.

“Mercy gave me the proper soil to grow my desire to help people,” she said. 
Service is something that comes naturally to the alumna who attended Mercy from 2001 to 2005.  She decided to go to the school after touring the school with a friend. 

While at Mercy she was on the Student Council for four years, active in theatre, participated in Cross Country and debate.  She helped start a science fiction and fantasy club and remembers dressing up as characters from "Harry Potter” and “Lord of the Rings.” 

“Mercy had a great atmosphere.  You could be who you wanted to be.  There were many unique opportunities. I was even able to start my own club,” she said. 
After her graduation from Mercy, Hannah went to Creighton University where she earned a degree in Social Work in 2009.  She worked for Alegent Health for three years. She decided to go to the University of Nebraska Omaha, started studying for a medical degree, and was accepted to St. Louis Medical School.  

“Pursuing a medical degree was not in the cards. My fulfilling experiences working with refugees were a signal that this type of work was meant for me,” she said. 

As a volunteer, Hannah was putting in 70 plus hours at Restoring Dignity and last year became a permanent employee.  

“Refugee families reach out to us with tragic stories of need and the need is growing. These refugees have fled to our country because of genocide or civil war in their homelands.  But often when they get here, the substandard housing they are forced to live in is horrendous,” Hannah said.

Her organization has advocated for housing changes in Omaha and testified recently to get mandatory inspections for rental properties.  

“Mercy opened my eyes to social justice and helping the poor. That theme of compassion and service is not witnessed often in other high schools, and I am glad that desire was nurtured in me at Mercy,” she said.  

P. S. If you are interested in volunteering with local refugee families, Restoring Dignity is always looking for help! You can sign-up to help at: www.rdomaha.com
 
Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

The Plan All Along

June 10, 2019
By Deb Daley

Working for social justice was always part of the plan according to Emily Staley ’14, who is a part of Mercy Volunteer Corps in Philadelphia.  There she is assigned to Project Home, an outreach program for those who are street homeless. Emily is an advocate and helps individuals access services.  She heard about the work of Mercy Volunteer Corps her freshman year at Mercy during Theology class and knew it was an experience she wanted.

Not bad for someone who describes herself as a class clown during her years at Mercy High School. 

“I was not super involved at Mercy, but I loved the sense of community and the subjects of history, English and science.,” she said.  Her sister Ashley ’07 went there and introduced Emily to the school where she really enjoyed going to all her sister’s activities.  During high school, Emily also worked at Holy Cross School as an after-care worker.

After graduation, she attended the University of Nebraska Omaha’s Grace Abbott School of Social Work.  Emily was a member of Phi Alpha Honor Society and graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Social Work in 2018.

She finds her current work with Project Home very fulfilling and believes her days at Mercy High School helped her realize how compassionate service can make a difference in the world. 

Emily has many stories of her work in Philadelphia and share done that made an impact on her.

“There was a veteran living on the streets who was very frustrated that he could not get access to services he knew he deserved.  He described his journey as going in circles.  I became his advocate, I was able to identify the information and contacts he needed, and to find him eligible services.  I see him periodically and he greets me fondly every time I see him,” she said. 

She also says her Mercy education provided a firm foundation for her life.

“I recall Mr. Humphreys, History Teacher, giving me some great advice about my passion and assertive behavior to get things done.  He told me to pick my battles, to speak my mind, but still use discretion,” she said. 

In interviewing Emily, it is obvious she is passionate about social work.  She has signed up for another year with the Mercy Volunteer Corps and will be working in San Francisco.  After that, she hopes to attend graduate school with an emphasis in alcohol and drug counseling or to go on to receive a law degree in conjunction with her Master's of Social Work pushing on the macro level for policy and systemic change. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Service Guides Her Life

May 20, 2019
By Deb Daley

Catherine McAuley once said, "We should be shining lamps, giving light to all around us."  When Kimberly Bujarski Prenzlow ’98 was at Mercy she took those words to heart.  As a student she was very involved in Campus Ministry, Operations Others, and other service projects eventually earning an Ignatian Scholarship to St. Louis University.

Not bad for someone who lacked confidence and was very introverted when she came to Mercy as a freshman.

“At Mercy I really came out of my shell. The smaller environment allowed me many opportunities and the ability to truly be myself,” she said. 

During her high school years, she was a Student Ambassador, a class officer, and participated in numerous service projects.  She was chosen as May Queen her senior year at May Crowning, an honor recognizing her as a student that exemplified the qualities of Mary our Mother.

“I have always tried to lead my life like Mary’s.  Many of the teachers showed me by example those values.  I also saw the power of teachers building relationships with students and how important that was,” she added.

Her connection to service led to her college scholarship.  She was required to do 40 hours of service work each semester while pursuing her Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education.  After graduation, she worked at elementary schools in the St. Louis area, eventually moving back to the Omaha area teaching at several Catholic grade schools.

She got married in 2010 and moved with her husband to Norman, Oklahoma and taught junior high religion for four years.  She moved back to Omaha again four years ago and currently teaches at Mary Our Queen in the 2nd grade. 

“I am a product of Catholic education and believe that education can be a route for serving other people.  I also try to emulate my former Mercy teachers by building relationships with my students,” she said. 

She also feels Mercy was instrumental in preparing her for motherhood. She and her husband could not have children, so they decided to adopt. 

“It was a roller coaster journey requiring a great deal of growth and trust,” she said.

‚ÄčThe couple waited two years to adopt their first child James.  He was born in Las Vegas, so we had to fly on short notice to meet him within 24 hours of his birth. 

“It was a wild trip, but the precious gift was worth it,” she said
In a similar fashion, they waited two years for their second child, Veronica.  

“We received a phone call that her birth mom was in labor in Iowa, so we drive through the night and made it there within minutes after she was born,” she added.

She tries to keep connected with classmates through social media, has dinner periodically with Mercy friends, and last year she helped plan the class reunion. 
“Mercy is truly a special place, and we feel it gave us faith and confidence in our future,” she said.

She credits Mercy in helping her understand the importance of service that she practices as a teacher and a mother.  

“Mercy sculpted me into the person I am today.  The love and care the school taught me was God’s gift and gave me the strength to put my future in his hands.  You become a Woman of Mercy for life and understand the importance of using your talents in service,” she said.  

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.  

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Changing Chicago Communities

May 17, 2019
By Deb Daley

One voice or person taking action can make a difference.  Just spend a few minutes talking to Caitlin Botsios ’08 and her energy and commitment to that premise comes through loud and clear.  The educator, entrepreneur, and civic engager has put that commitment into action as Co-founder and Chief Innovation Officer for Helix Chicago. Located in Chicago, Helix’s mission is to reduce youth unemployment by opening businesses that provide jobs and skill development for 16-24-year olds.  

Although her parents suggested other high schools, Caitlin was always fascinated by the all-girls high school across the street from her grade school, Holy Cross.  The outgoing student wanted to be involved in theatre and wanted to leverage the many leadership opportunities available at a modestly sized all-girls high school.  And involved she was.

At Mercy, she was a member of Student Council for three years including being Vice President her senior year, President of the Thespian Chapter, Co-Director of the Mercy Day play, a Student Ambassador, on the Speech Team, in the Mercy High Singers, Operation Others Core Team, and the Justice and Peace Club. 

“I think I was in every play all four years except for one, and I even tried my hand at sports one year.  However, perhaps my impact was being a co-founder of Mission Week,” she added.

Mission Week is a week-long schedule of activities held at Mercy to support the international educational goal set by the network of Mercy schools on an annual basis.

Caitlin appreciated the educational values taught at Mercy including the focus on social consciousness and forward thinking.

“I learned that through service and education a single person can make a difference,” she said. 

She was determined to leave Nebraska after graduation and attend a college that matched her values.  She decided on Loyola University of Chicago because of its Jesuit values.  Caitlin earned a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Communication Studies at Loyola and went on to obtain a Master’s in Teaching from Dominican University.  She taught middle school for several years.  Her love of teaching came naturally.  Her mother is a teacher at All Saints Elementary School. 

In 2015, she joined WE (previously Free The Children), an international non-profit focused domestically on service-learning and civic engagement and internationally on holistic, sustainable development.  After WE, she served on the national alumni team for Teach For America.

“My experiences in education and working in the nonprofit sector made me keenly aware of the systemic inequities and disparity of services based on zip codes.  I believed change could occur if we partnered with communities and applied education and business acumen to the root causes of inequity like unemployment and disproportionate services in neighborhoods.  That is how Helix was formed,” she said. 

According to Caitlin, Helix collaborates across sectors and partners with community members to determine what neighborhood needs are not being addressed. They then open businesses that address those needs and employ primarily 16-24 year-olds within the business.  The first endeavor of the group was opening Helix Café in May 2019 in the Edgewater community in Chicago.  The full -service café employs 10 workers who receive on-the-job training and paid weekly personal and professional development.  The organization is also developing a youth entrepreneurship summer camp and is working with local chambers, businesses, and colleges to create a pipeline to the next opportunity for employees. 

“Mercy certainly highlighted for me how service and social enterprises can have measurable impact on people.  It showed me the importance of community and how working together through a network can help you to build and organize,” she added.

Caitlin still keeps in touch with many of her classmates and lives a few blocks away from a Mercy classmate.  

“At Mercy there is this wonderful community that is with you the rest of your life. Classmates are a diverse but like-minded group from all walks of life,” she said.

Her classmates would be proud. Caitlin’s voice and action has made a difference.  Just ask those benefiting from Helix. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Alumnae Career Day

March 21, 2019
By Deb Daley

Twenty-two Mercy alumnae and four community representatives visited the sophomores and seniors to discuss careers on March 25.  Students were surveyed about jobs they were interested in and alumnae in those fields were asked to attend.

In a “speed-date” like forum, students will rotate between alumnae grouped together by professional fields.
Careers of interest ranged from health care to public service, fine arts, education, and the law. 

Our participants were:
Rose Grabow Anderson' 03, Owner of Baela Rose
Amanda Peterson Baker '98, Real Estate Appraisal at Kinteic Valuation Group
Siryeya Belton '09, Youth Pastor at Dream City Church Omaha
Molly Collins Beran, MD, FACOG '97, Doctor of Obstetrics and Gynocology with CHI Health
Katelyn Cherney '04, Staff Attorney at the Milton R. Abrahams Legal Clinic at Creighton University School of Law
Kaylea Dunn '96, Performance Consultant at HDR
Malinda Frevert '07, Deputy Digital Director at the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee
Helen Holmes Giambrone '97, Disease Investigator at the Douglas County Health Department
Becky Dale Girthoffer '99, Global PMO Manager at LinkedIn
Emily Gonderinger '09, Transportation and Logistics Specialist at Gavilon
Kayla Thomas Haire '93, Media Relations Coordinator at Nebraska Medicine
Mary Kirchoffer, retired from the Omaha Police Department
Amy Harmon Lane, Ph. D. '86, Theater & Dance Coordinator at the Creighton University College of Arts & Sciences
Angela Wieberg Maynard, RN, BSN, CPN '83, Assistant Director, Clinical Support at Creighton University Student Health Services
Danielle Meier, Bass and Vice President of Artistic Administration at the Omaha Symphony
Kashmir Miedl '10, Owner of Theory 12 Massage and Wellness, LLC
Kelly Nystrom '86, Associate Professor and Acting Assistant Dean, Office of Academic and Student Affairs at the Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions
Meg Latka Peters '04, Nursing Informatics Lead at Nebraska Medicine
Leanne Prewitt '97, Creative Director at Ervin & Smith
Cynthia Russell, BS, DDS '76, Adjunct Associate Professor at the Creighton University School of Dentistry
Judy Niemoller Sorenson '75, VP/Audit Manager, Credit & Counterparty Audit  at Bank of the West
Carolyn Andreasen Taylor '71, Teacher (retired) from Holy Cross Catholic School
Erin Walsh, PA-C, Physicians Assistant at Creighton University Student Health Services
Francie Riedmann Weis '81, Judge with the State of Nebraska
Brittany Willmore '08, Social Worker with the Nebraska AIDS Project
A representative from the Omaha Fire Department

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Best Years of My Life

March 13, 2019
By Deb Daley

“The first five words that come from my mouth when I talk about Mercy are ‘the best years of my life,’” said Megan O’Hara Hayes ’09. The Digital and National Sales Assistant in the Advertising and Sales Department at WOWT is grateful to Mercy for helping her find the best version of herself.

Ironically, she did not want to attend Mercy because both of her sisters and mother went to Marian.  Her mother insisted that Mercy would be a better fit. 
“After the first day I was content, and during my time there contentment turned into love,” she said.

Megan was also fortunate to able to talk with other relatives about the Mercy experience.  Her aunt, Colleen O’Hara Allsion ’65, went to Mercy and played Catherine McAuley in the Mercy Day Play.  Her grandmother, Patricia Murphy McGonigal ’56, also told her stories about helping to tile the hallways when the school was built.

While at Mercy, Megan played catcher and second base on the softball team for four years.  She loved to sing and became a member of the Concert Choir and Mercy High Singers.  She was also active in Campus Ministry, Theatre, and Speech.  During her senior year she played Judas in a one-act of Godspell, which did well in competitions. 

“When I was younger, I had trouble speaking in front of people. At Mercy I was able to excel on the Mercy Speech Team in Districts and State.  Mercy turned a weakness into a strength,” Megan said.

Megan studied Theology and English at the College of St. Mary.  She also played softball in college.  She wasn’t sure what she wanted to do following graduation but prayed for some sort of sign to lead her in the right direction.

“The word ‘advertising’ kept popping in my head, so I applied at a local promotional advertising company and eventually landed the job at WOWT, the third generation O’Hara to work there,” she added. 

In her current position, Megan assists with both the analytical and creative processes of online and television ads. 

“Because of Mercy, I’ve learned to push beyond my comfort zone, set goals, and reach higher and higher.  Of course, I use my degree in my current position but because of the confidence I gained at Mercy. I can push beyond my comfort level,” she said.

Megan tries to give regularly to the school and is a proud ambassador for the education she received.

“It’s easy to teach things from a book at any school, but at Mercy I learned so many valuable things that weren’t on a study guide. There is no cookie cutter or mold of a typical Mercy Girl, but the two constant components are confidence and compassion,” she said. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Wieberg Named Mercy Alumna Award Recipient

February 15, 2019
By Deb Daley

A famous author once said, “The family is God’s greatest masterpiece.” Ann Bendon Wieberg ’57 has been working on that masterpiece all her life. Motivated by faith and devoting her time and energy to family, she has led a life as a Woman of Mercy. For Ann, that family has not only included her immediate family, but her Mercy family and her community.  She has been named the 2019 Distinguished Woman of Mercy Alumna, an award given by the Mercy High School Alumnae Association.   

The award recognizes an alumna for her outstanding achievements, service, and contributions, which promote the growth of faith, knowledge, and service in her career, community and/or society.  As the recipient of this award, the honoree is someone who is respected by peers, outstanding in her field, and promotes society in a way that benefits many people.

Ann started high school at St. John’s and migrated to Mercy when the schools joined in 1955.  Her parents wanted her to go to Catholic school and the logical choice was St. John’s as the family attended St. John’s Church.  

When she was 15, her mother passed away.  As the oldest of six, she stepped up and helped to care for her siblings, the youngest a 15-month old.  This did not allow time for after school activities, but Ann loved her Latin and English classes and how the Mercy’s commitment to a faith education reinforced her values.

“At Mercy the teachers cared about you, modeled positive behavior, and instilled in us both academics and life lessons.  Service was not an after-thought; it was part of everything we did.  I also made life-long friends I still have today,” she said.  
Because of family obligations, she could not afford to go on to college.  She started working two weeks after graduation at AT&T. Ann married John Wieberg in 1963 and started her own family. She had five children, including four daughters who also attended Mercy. ( Angela Wieberg Maynard ’83 , Susan Wieberg Meschede ’84, Mary Ann Wieberg Tietjen ’90, and Theresa Wieberg Cook ’98)

 “My husband John and I felt it was important for our girls to go to Mercy.  The value of a same-sex education was undeniable, and it gave our girls leadership opportunities they would not have experienced anywhere else,” she said. 

Over the years, in addition to providing support as a Mercy parent, she volunteered for Right to Life, delivered meals to families at shelters, and kept active in her church and community by serving on the Parish Council and School Board.  She also tries to bring a feeling of family to her friends who are homebound by connecting with them on a regular basis.

Her love of Mercy runs deep.  She has served on the school’s Alumnae Council for five years.  The Golden Guild Tea, where alumnae who graduated 50 or more years ago come back to the school to be honored, was her brainchild.

“This celebration is a nice way for women of my age to connect with the school and their classmates,” she said.

Her family masterpiece continues to be created.  Three sisters, two nieces and all three granddaughters have attended Mercy.  The third, Kate Tietjen will graduate this May.

In nominating Ann for the award, the nominator said, “With great dedication and humility, she excels in all areas that make up the recipient of this award.  She is truly the epitome of a Woman of Mercy. “ 

The announcement was made at the school’s annual FIESTA on February 16, but she will receive the award at the school’s 2019 All-School Reunion on Sunday, June 2 at Mercy.
 

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Teachers Helped Her to Succeed

February 11, 2019
By Deb Daley

Work is bringing Sarita Schroeder Hollander ’97 Visual Media Manager, HDR, back to Mercy High School in February.  She will be coordinating photography for the firm, showcasing the recent renovations that have been made in the school’s science laboratories.  HDR was the architectural designer on the project.

The wife and mother of two boys remembers fondly her time at Mercy from1993-1997.  Her parents wanted her to go to a private school and Sarita wanted to go to an all-girls school.  Several of her classmates from Our Lady of Lourdes grade school attended Mercy so she got on board.  Antoinette Ferrara Schroeder '73, her mother, and eight of her mother’s sisters also attended Mercy.

Although she wasn’t the strongest student and she had to work during her high school years to help pay bills, she recalls fondly two teachers that showed her care, attention and encouragement. 

“Teachers make all the difference in the world.  They have an important and powerful impact on a student.  Ms. Heather Newville took the time to explore nontraditional ways to test me, so my grades didn’t fail.  And Ms. Sherri Hoffman’s teaching style and passion will always stand out to me,” she said. 

According to Sarita, attending an all-girls school also allowed the atmosphere to be relaxed and the conversations to be deep with few judgements. 

She attended the University of Nebraska Omaha and switched to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln her second year where she discovered that an Arts path was her destiny.  Sarita also discovered she learned better through unconventional methods and not a traditional lecture, university style.  She moved back to Omaha, attended a community college, and earned a degree in Graphic Communication Arts.  She honed her artistic skills while at Borsheims for more than 10 years, launching the firm’s first website and being responsible for all photography. 

She has been with HDR for 11 years and currently manages the company’s global photography and cinematography studio.  She travels several times a month to capture the buildings and tell stories based on HDR architects’ work.   

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

 

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Mercy Saved Her

February 08, 2019
By Deb Daley

Dara Green ’94 described herself as a scared and fragile teen when she came to Mercy, who felt misunderstood, threatened, and often challenged authority.  She left knowing who she was, confident, and ready for the journey ahead of her.
“Mercy, hands down, saved my life - from my mother’s decision to send me to Mercy, to the school tolerating me for my first two years, to embracing me my last two years,” she said.

Dara had gone to public school before attending Mercy. Her transition to Catholic school was rocky not only because of assimilation issues, but because she had a non-diagnosed anxiety disorder.  Luckily in her final two years at school, she was able to receive outside medical help and the administration and faculty at Mercy worked with her on her anxiety.

After graduation, she attended The School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) where she double majored in Ceramics and Art Education.  

“Being an artist has been my calling for as long as I can remember.  Being an educator was realized as a junior in high school because I wanted to become the type of teacher who strived to understand the misunderstood,” she added. 

She taught in the Chicago public schools for seven years at the Vaughn Occupational High School, serving students with mild to severe cognitive delays.  She started the art education program there.

“I believe that every student should have the highest quality of art education, despite available funding.  I organized and hosted an annual silent auction of student work to fund the program,” she added.  

While at Vaughn, Dara earned a National Board of Professional Teaching Certificate.

In December 2002 she moved to Des Moines, Iowa, where she taught at a couple of public schools before joining the faculty at Central Academy in 2006. The school provides additional programming for gifted and highly motivated high school students. Again, there was no art program prior to Dara’s arrival.  

“Our mission at the Central Academy studio is to inspire passion in our high school students to observe, envision, engage, persist, and reflect on themselves as creators, innovators, and community members through the ceramic arts.  In the studio, we use the ceramic arts to teach students the essential skills to be successful in life,” she said. 
Her pottery program started with a handful of students and has grown to over 100. More students are trying to get in, so Dara is spearheading a fundraising effort that has raised more than $400,000 to build a larger studio.
As a teacher, Dara embraces differentiated learning styles. Her studio is a flipped classroom, where the instruction is recorded by the teacher and students can access lessons via YouTube. 

“In a flipped classroom, instruction is switched. Students do their passive learning outside of the classroom and homework or active learning is done in concert with the teacher, allowing more time for me to work one-on-one to meet individual needs,” she explained.  

She has presented at two national conferences about flipped classrooms and the way social media has supported her student’s learning experience through YouTube and celebrating student’s work on Instagram and Snapchat. 

“My goal as an art educator is for the studio to be student-centered and student-run.  Today and tomorrow’s students need to learn and be able to fail, persist, think outside the box, and triumph over questions we don’t even know exist yet,” she said. 

Having lived her own experience of struggle and misunderstanding that was mitigated at Mercy, Dara tries to approach each student knowing they all wish to succeed, no matter how compliant they may appear.

“I strive to get to know the whole person, so I have a better understanding of how to be my best self for each one of them,” she said. 

Photography by Jami Milne
 

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Foster Care Aligns with Mercy Values

February 07, 2019
By Deb Daley

Helping to bring together families in crisis is a shared mission for Amanda Fulton ‘98 and Paul Tschudin, Technology Director. Foster care helps to provide a safe and stable environment for a child who cannot be with his or her parents for some reason. The need for foster care has reached epidemic proportions as almost a million children are currently in foster care but the number is growing.  

Amanda has taken the words of Catherine McAuley to heart, especially Catherine’s call to serve those who are in need.  In Amanda’s case, she sees the goal of fostering children as a way of living Mother McAuley's words as well as fulfilling her dream of being a mom.   

She attended Mercy from 1994 to 1998. As a student, Amanda played sports and was involved in theatre, campus ministry, and Student Ambassadors.  After graduation, she attended Texas Christian University (TCU) in Fort Worth, Texas.  

Amanda earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. She then worked as a pediatric nurse in Rhode Island for 15 months and worked at Nebraska Medicine from 2003-2016.  She worked a few other jobs but returned to Nebraska Medicine in 2017. 

“The beauty of nursing is I could choose a variety of ways of providing service through nursing and caring for others,” she said.

Since September of 2017, Amanda has been working at Nebraska Medicine in radiation oncology, which allows her the flexibility to care for her family.

Amanda started the foster care licensing process in 2008, was licensed in 2010, and got her first placement in the summer of that year. Her background in nursing became a real asset as she navigated the health care system for children.  One of the defining moments in her life was when she received a call to care for a newborn baby who was in the NICU.  She met Everett when he was a week old. 

“It was pretty much love at first sight even though I knew my time with him could be temporary,” she said.

Thanks to her family and friends, Amanda decided to adopt Evertt in September 2016. He is now in pre-kindergarten at Holy Cross Catholic School in Omaha.  
About eight months later, his sister Evelyn came along. Taking her as a foster child was a no-brainer for Amanda, because keeping siblings together as a family helps children feel safe and at home. 

Evelyn came to Amanda's household when she was three days old. Although caring for two youngsters as a single mom is often challenging, Amanda again credits family, friends, and Mercy connections for helping her through.  She adopted Evelyn in December 2017. 

“I’m lucky to have a nursing career that allows me flexibility to care for my children. Catherine McAuley and women of Mercy inspired me to be an independent, confident  woman, focused on service and dedication while caring for young people.  I could not have done this without my Mercy influence,” she said. 

Paul Tschudin’s journey to foster care was different, but his experience at Mercy impacted his decision to be a foster parent.

“Mercy’s mission to inspire young girls to become confident women of Mercy who embody faith, knowledge, and compassionate service is something that I try to live every day at work. But this mission has also seeped its way into my personal life,“ Paul said.

Paul grew up in Papillion and graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a degree in Business, Marketing, and Technology in 2013.  He has been at Mercy for five years and earned a Master’s in Educational Leadership from Creighton University in 2017.  

As Mercy's Director of Technology, Paul works with classroom teachers on instructional technology and supports the school’s network, equipment, and infrastructure needs.  

“My wife and I were at church and picked up a connection card that listed activities we could be involved in together.  The last entry was foster care classes.  We decided to try it. Even though at times the classes were challenging, we stuck with it,” he said.

Soon after they were licensed, they received a placement, and as of February they are in their fifth month of foster care of two young girls. 

“It was definitely God’s plan as we got placement so quickly,” he added.

According to Paul, his and his wife’s lives have transformed dramatically. 
“Every day my interactions with these girls as their foster dad has been to help them become confident girls who embody faith, knowledge, and compassionate service. Our girls bring us so much joy! We love having them around,” Paul said. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

 

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Mercy Education Shaped Engineeer

February 01, 2019
By Deb Daley

Our education lies at the heart of how we approach the world.  Mercy played a large part in shaping me into the person I am today, and I wouldn’t have it any other way,” said Angela Jacobson Weiss ’99.

Angela, a Senior Project Engineer, has been at Thermal Energy System Specialists (TESS) for eight years.  At TESS, she does energy performance simulations for renewable energy systems, green buildings, and other innovative energy systems. She also does troubleshooting, training, and development work on the software used in running simulations.

She credits Mercy with giving her a strong STEM foundation and has fond memories of the teachers there. 

“Maureen Davis and Kristi Wessling taught me everything I know about geometry, trigonometry, algebra, and calculus.  College was really finishing school for me on these subjects.  I was very lucky to have such guiding lights at such a formative time in my life,” she said. 

While at Mercy, she was heavily involved in theatre.  Angela also participated in vocal ensembles, speech tournaments, Chemistry Field Day, and the annual High School Math Exam.

Mercy helped Angela find confidence in a safe and supportive space where she could be creative, quirky, and get excited about things like celebrating Mole Day and Sir Isaac Newton’s birthday.

“Throughout grade school and junior high, I never clicked with the rest of my class, and I tried to disappear.  At Mercy, I found like-minded friends, and I started to grow into myself,” she said. 

Angela graduated from Mercy in 1999 and attended Iowa State University where she earned a degree in mechanical engineering.  She attended graduate school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, earning a Master’s Degree through the Solar Energy Lab in Mechanical Engineering in 2006.  Her first job was at Nexant, an energy services company, for five years before she went to TESS.

Her current position has taken her all over the world to undertake on-site software trainings. 

“When I lead my trainings, I try to emulate my favorite teachers at Mercy by being approachable, engaged, and hands-on with the material.  I invite discussion, and I make sure they realize there are no stupid questions," she said.

Even though she lives 400 miles away, Angela finds ways to keep connected to Mercy through social media, publications, and conversations.  She also makes annual charitable contributions through her company by designating Mercy as her charity of choice.

“Education is one of the most life-changing investments we can make in ourselves, our children, and our community.  Mercy is, in my experience, one of the best places to trust with a girl’s education,” she said. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

 

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Alumna Studies STEM

January 02, 2019
By Deb Daley

Sarah Austin ’18 is putting her Mercy education to good use.  The first-year Biological Systems Engineering student at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln built a night train bobsled for a class project and the efforts were captured on Facebook. The objective was to make an autonomous vehicle that was programmed to stop when the photo sensor saw a bright light. 

While at Mercy, Sarah was involved in the National Honor Society, Future Business Leaders of America, and the Golden Girls.  
 
“Mercy prepared me to work on these projects because of the experience I had in Chemistry and Physics. I think research and projects in STEM-related fields are important because they are hands on and give you real life experience if you plan to go into a STEM field,” she said. 

Sarah’s long-term career goals are to graduate with a degree in Biological Systems Engineering with an emphasis in BioMedical Engineering.  She is hoping to do something with that degree in the field of prosthetics. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Three Women of Mercy Work on Play

October 24, 2018
By Deb Daley

As three Women of Mercy, they learned empowerment, the importance of team work, and the value of collaboration.  At the same time, they discovered that if you have a great idea, you can make it happen. Shayne Kennedy, playwright, Amy Harmon Lane ’86, Creighton Coordinator of Theatre & Dance and Viv Parr ’16, Creighton drama student, will see the fruits of their efforts appear on stage during the play, “Handled,” from October 31 - November 4 at Creighton University’s Lied Education Center for the Arts.   

How the three came together on this production is an interesting story of Mercy connections. 

Shayne Kennedy is a Mother McAuley of Chicago graduate and Mercy associate. She had an idea for a play dealing with mother-daughter relationships, depression, and the pressure of social media. 

“I am a mother and know first-hand the stigma of mental illness and the inclination of a parent to try to take matters in their own hands,” she said.  

The play tells the story of a mother who tries to create a social media profile for her daughter after her daughter’s stint at a rehab center. The play includes six strong women characters. 

During the development process of the play, Shayne reached out to her Creighton classmate Amy Harmon Lane ’86, also a Mercy graduate, to see if the university could host a workshop on the play.  That took place in 2017 and the production was enhanced to make it ready for public consumption. 

 “I thought the strong female characters and the relevance of social media and mental health issues made it a perfect option for this year’s fall production.  We were also able to get a grant to have Shayne as an advisor during the run of the play,” said Amy.

Amy’s love of theatre was cultivated at Mercy High School where she was active in drama, music, speech and band.  She also felt that the all-girls community made her a confident person.

“At Mercy, you learned it was about letting everyone be great. It wasn’t competitive; It was about everyone succeeding,” she added.

Amy received her Bachelor’s in Fine Arts (BFA) in Theatre from Creighton, a Master’s in Fine Arts in Directing from the University of Memphis, and a Ph. D. from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan.  

Her days at Mercy also gave her a unique perspective towards the play. 

“At Mercy, we were women working together and talking about current issues.  The women in this play are doing the same thing, dealing with important issues of mental illness and social media, “she said. 

The final Mercy connection is Creighton student and 2016 Mercy graduate Viv Parr.  She is student director and Dramaturg for “Handled,” which entails providing research on the many issues surrounding the play. She created a Twitter dictionary of terms to help actors and audience members with common phrases and acronyms that may be unfamiliar. Viv is currently working toward her BFA in theater performance and a Bachelor’s in Music with a minor in Women and Gender Studies. 

She is inspired by Amy and Shayne because they approach their art with “sensitivity and wisdom.”

Viv also sees her Mercy years have added perspective in her approach to directing. 

“It is always important to approach themes of plays from an honest place. The issues of mental illness and the negative impacts that social media will be very real to most of our audience. Mercy taught me to always have empathy for other people. I try to look at this play through an empathetic lens and remember that the story onstage is a truth for many people,” she said.

Viv was also active in theatre and music at Mercy.  She was the secretary of Student Council and President of Mercy’s Theatre Troupe.  

“I graduated from Mercy confident in my ability to be a leader. In college, I now feel prepared to hold a leadership role and do so in an effective and positive way. I use the leadership skills Mercy cultivated in me every time I am given an opportunity to work in groups of people,” she said.
 
A play brought them all together.  All these women symbolize what being a Woman of Mercy truly means.  

Side Note: 
The play also received help from another department at Creighton. Brian Kokensparger, professor in Journalism, Media & Computing, had attended a presentation where computer science students were supporting a theatre production.   He went to Amy and they discussed how his Software Engineering students could help with “Handled,” especially since it deals with social media issues. 

“It was decided near the end of the summer that my students would be enhancing the world of the play, working to help engage the audience before and after the play.  We hope to add to the audience members' overall experiences of the play itself by providing apps, games and other programs,” he said. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Moving Forward Despite Challenges

October 10, 2018
By Deb Daley

Perseverance and a thirst for knowledge are two traits that have been a consistent part of Sarah Ruff’s ‘15 young life. Despite severe epilepsy that started in the 8th grade, she graduated from Mercy and is finishing her degree in Journalism/Advertising and Public Relations at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

While attending Mercy she was part of the Golden Girls, spirit club, and worked at a local grocery store. Her younger sister, Therese Ruff now attends the school.

“At Mercy they not only helped with my studies; students and faculty and staff were always there to help you along the way. They helped me believe I could do anything, and I made friends for life,” she said.

That belief has come in handy because of health obstacles that have tried to get in the way. She has always been intrigued by the political process and hopes to work on a newspaper writing about politics.

She has had two major brain surgeries to implant electrical devices designed to counter the onset of her com-plex partial seizures and short-circuit them. She has undergone observation and induced seizures at UNMC and at Mayo Clinic in Rochester before placement of these devices to help guide the surgeons to the right spot of the brain.

With her condition she cannot drive, but she is hoping to move to Minneapolis, which has a very good public transportation system. 

Unfortunately, she tends to wander during a seizure, unaware of her surroundings and sometimes crossing busy streets, walking through parking lots, leaving class and walking through campus, even dialing friends’ numbers and talking, but not realizing what she is doing. 

Her family is currently raising money for a service dog (at a $28,000 price tag) to help her keep safe and cope with these challenges. 

Although life has put obstacles in her way. Sarah’s spirit and tenacity will serve her well as she journeys forward as a Woman of Mercy. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

From Omaha to the World

October 01, 2018
By Deb Daley

As a Public Diplomacy Foreign Service Officer, she works with embassies in the Middle East and North Africa to ensure that U. S. policy, programs, and values are shared with people in those countries.  Mary Lou Johnson-Pizarro ’74 has traveled extensively throughout her career and feels Mercy was very influential in shaping who she is and the career path she chose.

Mary Lou was a member of St. Thomas More parish and joined one of her best friends (Laurie Kowal Straw ‘74) in attending Mercy High School.  She remembers the teachers being passionate about modeling behavior and teaching students how to be intelligent and capable Catholic women.  

“My classmates were fun and at times even a bit mischievous, but smart, curious and good-hearted.  I particularly enjoyed debate club and our ability to talk with teachers about the issues of the day.  I made lifetime friends and just this past week spent time with Robin Allen, another Mercy ’74 graduate,” she said.  

During her high school years, she also developed an interest in social justice and in fact is chairperson of her local parish’s social action committee that rewards funds to organizations in need.  

“At Mercy, I had many long conversations with fellow classmate Kate Dodson Sommers, and later Kate would be instrumental in founding the Komen Race for the Cure in Omaha.  I credit Kate with helping me find my passion in this topic,” she added.  

After she graduated from the University of Nebraska at Kearney August 1978 with a Bachelor’s in Arts with double-majors in history and sociology, she joined the Peace Corps and was assigned to Jamaica for two years.  She eventually moved to Washington, D. C. where she worked for a few years, mostly with non-profits.  She went to Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, graduated in 1988, and stayed in the Boston area where she worked in international development, specializing in education issues.  She first joined the U. S. Agency of International Development and then moved to the U. S. Department of State in 1999, where she continues to work today.  Along the way, she married and had one daughter, who recently graduated from the College of William and Mary and now works in Washington, D.C.  

“As a Foreign Service Officer, I have traveled extensively and have represented the U.S. in long-term tours in South Africa, Nigeria, and Venezuela.  I have chosen to work primary in the Americas and Africa, because these are nations that always fascinated me.  All these journeys have provided me and my family rich and memorable experiences I treasure,” she said. 

Mary Lou is currently posted to Washington, D. C. where she supports U. S. embassies in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and the Libya External Office, which is in Tunis, Tunisia on public diplomacy issues. 

“Being so far away it’s hard to be involved with Mercy, but I try to support the school.  I believe in Mercy’s mission to educate young women to contribute to Omaha and beyond, as it was the key in helping me find my spiritual pathway, but also fundamental in spurring an intellectual curiosity that allowed me to succeed in my professional career,” she added. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Skills Learned Led to Career

August 28, 2018
By Deb Daley

Confidence. Empowerment. Communication Skills.  These are all things that Kayla Thomas Haire ’93 learned at Mercy.  In fact, one of her fondest memories is being named state speech champion her junior year with an entertainment speech that focused on not stereotyping blonds and their abilities.  Those skills led her to a successful career in broadcast and communication.  

“My sister Holly picked Mercy, so my parents told me the decision was made.  I am grateful to her because it turned out to be one of the best experiences in my life,” she said.  Her mother, Lynda Lacoma Thomas ’65, went to Mercy and her sister, Molly Thomas, graduated in 1992. 

While at Mercy, Kayla was involved in speech, theatre and Student Council.  She played the Queen of the Fairies in “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”, winning co-best actress honors her senior year and was an evil step-sister in “Cinderella” her junior year.  That same year, she was a Junior Prom Princess.  She also spent a couple seasons on the school’s bowling team.  In fact, to this day, her favorite teacher was Mr. Hersh Rodasky who introduced her to public speaking. 

“My experiences in speech and theatre definitely helped to build my confidence and led me to my career,” she said.  

She has maintained close relationships with her classmates and her best friend, Rebecca Redlinger Wesch ’93, had the locker next to her and also works now with Nebraska Medicine .

When Kayla graduated from Mercy, she decided to attend Loyola University in Chicago to study communications.

“I considered Chicago a mecca for broadcast journalism, and I felt I would have opportunities there,” she said.

She earned her Communications degree in 1997 and worked in television news as both a reporter and producer in Rockford, Illinois, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Jackson, Mississippi.  Kayla came home and spent 15 years at KMTV, most recently completing eight years as the executive producer of a local talk show, “The Morning Blend.” She is married and has two sons.

This summer, Kayla started another job that ties into her Mercy experience.  She is a Media/Communications Specialist for the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) and Nebraska Medicine.

She said, “At a time that our society is wrestling with women’s equality, the lessons I learned at Mercy, that women can achieve anything they want and deserve it, are invaluable.  There was serious girl power.”

During part of the week, Kayla works out of the Olson Center for Women’s Health.  Nearly all the doctors and health providers are female. She feels very comfortable in an environment that’s all about strong, educated women supporting and bettering each other. 

She tries to attend as many events as she can at Mercy and to support the school, especially by sharing her love for the school through social media. 

“I will always be a Woman of Mercy at heart.  Mercy helped shaped me into who I am today,” she said. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

Nursing Character in Action

August 28, 2018
By Deb Daley

There is a famous quote about nurses that describes alumna Ann M. Franco Laughlin ’ 72:  "The character of the nurse is as important as the knowledge she possesses." —Carolyn Jarvis.  

Ann, a Professor at Creighton University’s College of Nursing, learned the value of using her skills for the good of others while attending Mercy.

Ann is a legacy student.  Going to Mercy was a family tradition and Ann’s older sisters, Mary Franco Levy ’70 and Chris Franco Zadina ’71 had gone there.   Eventually her two other sisters, Theresa Franco ’74 and Catherine Franco Van Haute ’81, also attended.  
 
Ann’s time at Mercy was spent learning and being involved in debate, theatre and Student Council.  She was very shy in grade school but blossomed in high school.

“I went to debate tournaments twice a month.  I learned to present both sides of an argument and speak much more eloquently. It was a real self-confidence booster, and I also think, being at a single-sex school, there were less distractions and more opportunities to participate in leadership activities,” she said.

During high school, she also worked at a local nursing home and grew passionate about health care for the elderly.  

“I saw firsthand older people as not only a vulnerable population but, sometimes in nursing homes, forgotten.  From my years at Mercy, I knew I wanted to use my gifts and talents in compassionate care for people, especially the elderly,” Ann said. 

She decided nursing was her calling, and she enrolled at Creighton University after graduating from Mercy.  Ann earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing in 1976.  She was a staff nurse at several hospitals in Wisconsin as well as in Omaha.  She also became involved in Hospice, geriatric rehabilitation and more.  She went back to Creighton as a part-time teaching assistant while getting her Master of Science in Nursing.  Starting in 1994, Ann became an adjunct professor and moved up the academic ladder in the College of Nursing where she is now a tenured professor.  
In 2005, she received her Ph. D. from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln in Gerontology.  She has taught all level of students from undergraduates to graduates and has supervised students in clinic settings from nursing homes to hospitals.  Gerontology and medical surgical nursing are her fields of interest. She has published numerous papers and articles on these topics and has done focused research on health promotion in vulnerable populations.  

Ann’s awards and honors are numerous and include membership in Alpha Signa Nu, the Mary Lucretia and Sarah Emily Creighton Award, Heart Ministry Center Volunteer of the Year, Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence and more. She serves on the Parish Council at Holy Cross Church and as the chair of the Porto Clinic Advisory Board. 
Ann also supports Mercy, having served on the Alumnae Council for three years. She also attends FIESTA annually.  Both of her daughters, Rose Laughlin’ 08, an immigration attorney and Mary Laughlin’ 14, a recent graduate of Creighton, attended Mercy.

When asked about Mercy, Ann is quick to point out what she sees as the Mercy difference.

“What I love about Mercy is they walk the walk.  They embrace diversity at all socioeconomic and ethnicity levels. All students are welcomed there, and you don’t see that at all high schools.  It is important that students get exposed to different perspectives because that is what they will encounter in the real world,” she added. 

Have ideas for other alumnae features, contact Deborah Daley, Communications and Marketing Director, daleyd@mercyhigh.org.

Posted in Featured Alumnae

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